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Maximum Weekly Hours Calculator 


Enter the Monthly Authorized Hours here as: Hours and Minutes

Maximum Weekly Hours:   Hours and Minutes

This case includes pre-authorized or "normal" overtime of: hours and minutes each month.


Avoid Overtime Violations!:
Claim up to but not more than the Maximum Weekly Hours in each workweek on the timesheets for each recipient case.  Check the Maximum Weekly Hours for each recipient the provider works for.   If a recipient needs the provider to work more than the Maximum Weekly Hours in any workweek be sure to follow the overtime rules listed below and ask for an exception when needed.  Never claim more than the recipient Monthly Authorized Hours.  Never claim more than 66 hours per workweek in total from all recipients if the provider works for more than one recipient.  Be careful to correctly total hours when workweeks are split between two timesheets: see "Overtime Timesheet Questions".

 

Overtime is limited if a recipient's Maximum Weekly Hours are 40 or less:
If the Maximum Weekly Hours is 40 or less then a provider that works for only this one recipient can work up to 40 hours in any workweek (Sunday to Saturday) without the need to ask for an exception to adjust hours above the Maximum Weekly Hours.  No overtime will be claimed.  Never claim more than the recipients total Monthly Authorized Hours in any month.  If any overtime is claimed and paid on cases authorized 40 hours per week or less then the provider will get a violation unless an hours adjustment exception has been requested and approved by the county.  

 

Overtime is limited if a recipient's Maximum Weekly Hours are more than 40:
This case includes hours and minutes of "pre-authorized" overtime each workweek. (That is hours and minutes each month).   A provider that works for only this one recipient can be paid for that amount of overtime on this case without asking the county for an exception.  This is considered the amount of overtime the provider will "normally" work on this case.
If this overtime number is zero then the recipient must ask the county for an hours adjustment exception if there is a need for any overtime pay.  Overtime starts after 40 hours per workweek.    
If this overtime number is more than zero, then the recipient does not need to request an exception for the provider to be paid this number of overtime hours.  The recipient can adjust which week(s) within the month these overtime hours are worked without the need to ask the county for an exception.  Any time a provider that works for only this one recipient would need to work more than the total monthly number of  pre-authorized or "normal" overtime hours in a month the recipient must ask the county for an exception.
If an exception is needed but not requested and approved then the provider will get a violation.  Recipients can ask for exceptions before or after the hours are worked but the exceptions should be approved before timesheets are submitted for payment.  Remember that if a provider works for more than one recipient the provider may never work more than 66 hours per workweek in total from all the recipients the provider works for.   Never claim more than the total monthly authorized hours on a case. 

Please review the mailed notices to understand exception requests and violations.   Generally an exception will be approved if it is for something that directly affects the health or safety of the recipient and it is something unexpected that can't be postponed until later.   Repeated violations can result in penalties up to and including termination of the provider for one year.

 

Overtime is limited if a provider works for more than one recipient by the 66 hours/week maximum:
When a provider is working for more than one recipient an additional rule applies.  The provider is limited to a total of 66 hours of pay per workweek in total from all the recipients he/she works for. That is 40 hours of regular pay, plus 26 hours of overtime pay.  Travel time pay, if any, is not counted as part of the 66 hour limit.  A recipient can not request an exception from the county for the provider to work more than 66 hours per week if that provider works for more than one person.  Instead, the recipient will need to hire a different provider.  Assistance is available from the Public Authority Registry to help find an additional provider if needed.

 

Q: How do I mark which hours are Overtime hours on my timesheet?
A: You DO NOT mark them. You write regular hours and overtime hours the same way on your timesheet.  The timesheets are arranged in workweek blocks (Sunday to Saturday).    Whenever the total number of hours you enter in one of those workweek blocks adds up to more than 40 hours then all the hours more than 40 are automatically paid as overtime hours.     The computer will add them and calculate how many are overtime hours.  If you work for more than one recipient all the hours for all the recipients you work for in each workweek block are added together to see how many hours over 40 you may have worked.    Overtime is paid at one and one half times the normal hourly wage rate for all hours above 40 per workweek. 

Q: What happens when one workweek is split over two pay periods (two timesheets)?
A: Enter your hours on the timesheet as usual for each day you worked.  If the week is not finished on one timesheet (Saturday is the end of a workweek) you will still get paid for the partial week hours you claim on the current timesheet. The computer will total the partial week hours from all of your timesheets if you work for several people and will print it on all of the next pay period timesheets in the section marked "Claimed".  The computer will add the "Claimed" hours from the previous partial workweek to the workweek hours you claim on the current timesheet(s), and will pay you overtime for anything over 40 hours. Everything over 40 hours in one workweek (Sunday to Saturday) is overtime, even when the week is split over two timesheets.

Q: What does the "CLAIMED:"  hours on my timesheet mean?
A: To help you total your full hours for a workweek the computer will print next to the "CLAIMED" entry the total number of hours you have already claimed for that workweek on all of the timesheets already submitted for the previous pay period.   If you work for more than one recipient the CLAIMED amount is the total you claimed for ALL of the recipients on the previous pay period timesheets that have been received.   CLAIMED will only be accurate if all your previous timesheets have already been received and paid so it is best to keep your own  records of what you have already claimed each week.  Keep your own notes on a calendar or notebook to avoid claiming too many hours in any workweek and avoid violations.

Q: How do I know how many weekly hours I have?A: An IHSS recipient has been approved for the number of monthly hours that is printed on the first timesheet you get each month and on the NOA (Notice of Action Page 1) that is sent to the recipient each time there is any change to approved services.  To determine weekly hours use the calculator on this page.    Starting in February all providers and recipients will also be mailed notices that include the monthly and weekly authorized hours for each case.   In Santa Clara County the recipient can call the automated phone service, enter their Social Security Number, then hear the status of their case, including the number of monthly authorized hours.  The phone number is (408) 792-1600.    (Press 1 English,  Press 1 for Recipient, Press 1 for Case information, Enter SSN, Press 1,  Monthly hours will be read to you.).  This is an automated service without wait time.

Return to main Overtime Page here.

Additional Overtime FAQ here.

 

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